Pink October

Pink October started in California, United States, in 1997 and the movement quickly spread its pink color to all corners of the world.

October is the month of breast cancer prevention and this blog is going pink to support this movement celebrated in the entire world!

Breast cancer is more than 100 times more common in women than in men, although men tend to have poorer outcomes due to delays in diagnosis.

An international team, writing in the British Journal of Cancer, examined 40 separate studies looking at the potential link between breast cancer and diabetes. These studies involved more than 56,000 women with breast cancer, showing that:

  • Post-menopausal women with Type 2 diabetes had a 27% increased risk of breast cancer. Among those who had not reached the menopause, breast cancer rates were no higher in Type 2 diabetics.
  • Type 1 diabetes, which originates in childhood and is not linked to unhealthy lifestyles, was not linked to higher breast cancer rates either.

The authors have also suggested that a high body mass index (BMI), which is often associated with diabetes, may be an underlying contributing factor.

Some symptoms of breast cancer includes:

 – swelling of all or part of the breast
– skin irritation or dimpling
– breast pain
– nipple pain or the nipple turning inward
– redness, scaliness, or thickening of the nipple or breast skin
– a nipple discharge other than breast milk
– a lump in the underarm area

Breast cancer is the leading cause of death for women, but need not to be so: the earlier the tumor is discovered, less invasive will be the  treatment and the greater the chances of a cure. In the initial stage of the disease, the expectation reaches 95%. So annual visits to gynecologist,  frequent mammograms (from age 40) and self-examination are essential.

Incidentally, it is worth remembering: the self-examination should not be done as the only form of prevention. When the tumor is detectable in self-examination, because it is already developed – on the other hand, benign nodules may be confused with cancer. Clinical examination and mammograms are therefore essential as part of routine female.

Self Exam:

References:
pinkforoctober.org/
http://lnk.nu/telegraph.co.uk/264m.html
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-19585931
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One response to “Pink October

  1. Pingback: Diabetes and Cancer: An interview with Antoane Fernandes | LabateLab·

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